Hyperinsulinism due to Insulin Resistance

Hyperinsulinism due to Insulin Resistance

Hyperinsulinism usually occurs when cells lose their insulin sensitivity and become more resistant to it. When cells gradually lose their insulin sensitivity, the pancreas has to release more insulin so as to maintain the blood glucose (glycemia) levels within the normal range, causing a greater amount of insulin to circulate in the bloodstream.

This insulin secretion increase will offset the loss of insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance of the cells. When our cells become insulin resistant, the goal is to get the cells to increasingly recover their insulin sensitivity. For this to happen, it’s important to eat foods low in simple carbohydrates or of fast absorption, in smaller portions, eating several times a day, so insulin levels decline in the bloodstream, as this will significantly reduce the amount glucose in the blood entering through each food intake. If, however, we don’t make the necessary changes in our lifestyle and eat large amounts of rapidly absorbed carbohydrates quickly in each food intake, this situation will worsen, causing the pancreas to produce more and more insulin, and this will not only further increase insulin levels in the blood, it will also decrease the pancreas’s ability to produce insulin. If insulin resistance worsens or the pancreas’s insulin secretion ability decreases, blood sugar (glucose) levels will begin to rise. Diabetes occurs when blood glucose levels exceed normal parameters. Hyperinsulinemia, which compensates for the insulin resistance syndrome, will develop into type 2 Diabetes in about 10 years.

Nonetheless, this doesn’t have to be like that, as if we take all the necessary and timely measures to increase our cell’s insulin sensitivity, they will become less glucose intolerant, preventing a type 2 Diabetes diagnosis, so we’ll be able to enjoy a better quality of life.

More about …
Hyperinsulinemia or Hyperinsulinism